No evidence on effectiveness of smart home technologies

Clinical question: 
How effective are smart home technologies as an intervention for people with physical disability, cognitive impairment or learning disability, who are living at home?
Bottom line: 
Although the review produced a significant volume of literature on the use of smart technologies (such as customised mobile telephones and alarm and monitoring sensors) within healthcare, there were no studies testing their effectiveness. There is a lack of empirical evidence to support or refute the use of smart home technologies within health and social care.
Caveat: 
The integration of smart home technology to support health and social care is acquiring an increasing global significance. Provision is framed within the context of a rapidly changing population profile, which is impacting on the number of people requiring health and social care, workforce availability and the funding of healthcare systems. Smart home technologies include mobile telephones tailored to healthcare, electronic sensors that sound alarms in emergency situations, and sensors that can be placed in everyday home appliances such as fridges, ovens or doors, and that can send information to healthcare providers.
Context: 
The integration of smart home technology to support health and social care is acquiring an increasing global significance. Provision is framed within the context of a rapidly changing population profile, which is impacting on the number of people requiring health and social care, workforce availability and the funding of healthcare systems. Smart home technologies include mobile telephones tailored to healthcare, electronic sensors that sound alarms in emergency situations, and sensors that can be placed in everyday home appliances such as fridges, ovens or doors, and that can send information to healthcare providers.
Review CD#: 
CD006412
PEARLS No: 
124
Date: 
November, 2008
Authored by: 
Brian R McAvoy